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Local reaction to federal climate change solutions

A federal resolution called the 'Green New Deal' has Republicans and Democrats talking about ways to solve problems created by global warming. U.S. Senator Todd Young is publicly opposing the deal. News 18's Kayla Sullivan found out what he thinks we should be doing and got response from Purdue's Climate Change Research Center.

Posted: Mar 29, 2019 6:08 PM
Updated: Mar 29, 2019 10:38 PM

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) — A federal resolution called the 'Green New Deal' has Republicans and Democrats talking about ways to solve problems created by global warming.

U.S. Senator Todd Young is publicly opposing the deal. News 18's Kayla Sullivan found out what he thinks we should be doing and got response from Purdue's Climate Change Research Center.

"The good news is people are talking about climate change now more than ever and we are starting to talk about solutions," said Purdue Climate Change Research Center Director Jeff Dukes.

Solutions like the Green New Deal that calls to cut greenhouse gas emissions to net zero over ten years and guarantee jobs for everyone. U.S. Senator Todd Young calls it unrealistic with devastating consequences.

"If you want to drive your existing internal combustion engine car to work, well, you may have to trade that in for a bike," said Young. "I'm not joking. This is all what's called for under the Green New Deal."

Dukes said that's not the case.

"It's a big vision statement. It says we need to get away from fossil fuels, we need to get away from things that put more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and cause climate change," said Dukes. 

But the deal it doesn't have force of law. Dukes said the challenge now is to come up with a realistic plan. Young has some suggestions.

"I support increased investments in nuclear technology," said Young. 

Dukes said that could work but it is also very expensive. He said solar and wind energy and battery storage are cheaper.

"So, together that means you can have lots more renewable energy and you can store that energy now more cheaply in batteries for the times when the wind isn't blowing and the sun isn't shining," said Dukes. 

Dukes said congress has some big decisions to make and so do taxpayers.

"Are they willing to accept wind turbines in their region? Are they willing to accept nuclear power plants in their region?" asked Dukes. 

He hopes people will pay attention to this topic as politicians continue to make it a key campaign issue in the future.

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