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City of Frankfort cracking down on speeding

Six new, solar-powered speeding signs will be installed in several strategic places around the city by the end of the week.

Posted: Apr. 10, 2019 6:13 PM
Updated: Apr. 10, 2019 6:19 PM

FRANKFORT, Ind. (WLFI) - The City of Frankfort is working to install six new, solar-powered speeding signs in several strategic places around the city. One place seeing the new signs is South Clay Street, which runs right through Dorner Park and has a 15 mile-per-hour speed limit.

"The street is good, but they (cars) just make a race track out of it," said Sally Rogers, who has lived across the street from Dorner Park for the past eight years. She said she walks her dog Dakota across the street to the park two or three times a day.

"They come down that hill really fast, we almost got hit the other day," she said.

She said speeding is a problem in this area, and she isn't the only who has noticed the problem.

Mayor Chris McBarnes said in a statement released on the city's Twitter page that, "My office has experienced a high volume of calls complaining about speeding in these areas."

"The Mayor's Office and the police department have been getting complaints about speeding in certain parts of town," agreed Frankfort Street Superintendent Jason Forsythe.

The new signs are also on Kelley Road and Williams Road, both with a 30 mile-per-hour speed limit. Forsythe said many drivers don't even realize they are speeding through these roads. He said they might think are driving on county roads that are 45 miles-per-hour or more, when really the limit is much lower.

"We want people to adhere to those in hopes that we can slow things down in those areas and just keep people a little bit safer in town," he said.

The signs flash as a car's speed approaches the limit the sign is set two, and flashes an LED light at the driver when they go over the speed limit. Rogers said Dorner park is packed with kids and families on any nice day.

"A lot of times I'll be sitting on my front porch and the ball will roll over into my yard and I'll say wait a minute I'll get it, don't you cross the street," she said.

Forsythe said the signs will have a bigger impact than just alerting drivers to their speed. They will be used to collect traffic data.

"They are Bluetooth signs and we can download information of speeds that we will provide for the police department so they know where they need to be," he said.

He also said there have been misconceptions that these signs will take pictures of cars and send tickets to drivers.

"These have nothing to do with reading your license plate or keeping an eye on you to give tickets," he said. "This is to keep people safe more than anything."

He also said if they see success with these signs, there could be more installed around the city. Rogers said she's happy with the results already.

"You can see now how slow they are going, it has made a difference," she said.

"I've already noticed a difference just driving through these areas," said Forsythe, who added that all six signs should be up by the end of this week.

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