Pelosi prepares to send articles of impeachment to Senate

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is signaling there will be a vote next week on appointing impeachment managers and transmitting articles of impeachment to the Senate. CNN's Manu Raju reports.

Posted: Jan 10, 2020 7:50 PM
Updated: Jan 10, 2020 7:50 PM

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday she's preparing to send the impeachment articles to the Senate next week to start the trial of President Donald Trump.

Pelosi's letter signals the end of the weeks-long standoff between the House and Senate over the articles, after the California Democrat delayed sending the two articles of impeachment the House passed last month to the Senate while Democrats pressed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to agree to have witnesses in the trial.

LIVE UPDATES: The latest on President Trump's impeachment

"I have asked Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler to be prepared to bring to the Floor next week a resolution to appoint managers and transmit articles of impeachment to the Senate," Pelosi wrote in a letter to her caucus. "I will be consulting with you at our Tuesday House Democratic Caucus meeting on how we proceed further."

Pelosi's letter means the Senate impeachment trial could begin as soon as next week. The House needs to pass a resolution naming impeachment managers before the articles are formally sent to the Senate, and the Senate will also have to take procedural steps before the trial gets underway.

"At last," McConnell said as he departed the Capitol on Friday.

Republicans believe Trump could be acquitted in the Senate by the time of his February 4 State of the Union address, giving him a major platform to tout the outcome before a nationally televised audience, according to GOP sources involved in the planning.

The schedule outlined on Friday bolsters that possibility, with Pelosi indicating the articles of impeachment would be delivered to the Senate next week. Republicans are eager to move to acquit the President after opening arguments are completed, even as Democrats demand witnesses and documents. If four Republicans break ranks and vote with all 47 Democrats in the chamber to have witnesses or documents in the trial, however, it could scuttle hopes of congressional Republicans and the White House for a quick trial.

Senators could be sworn for the impeachment trial the day after the House votes to name managers, but the trial itself with arguments on the floor probably won't start until days after that. That's because the President's lawyers and the House managers will have to file their briefs before the trial begins. Operating under the Bill Clinton model, if the House sends the articles next week, trial arguments would likely begin the following week.

"We've been anxious to get started for the last -- how many weeks has it been now?" McConnell said. "And we'll get about it as soon as we can."

Asked if it was important to get a trial done by the State of the Union, McConnell said, "Well, look, we're just getting started and I'm glad we'll have the opportunity to do it. It's been a long wait and I'm glad it's over."

It's not clear whether Pelosi's gambit to withhold the articles will change the trajectory of the Senate trial. Democrats have pushed for the Senate to agree to hear from witnesses as part of the trial, accusing McConnell of a cover-up for coordinating with the White House.

"Leader McConnell's tactics are a clear indication of the fear that he and President Trump have regarding the facts of the President's violations for which he was impeached," Pelosi wrote Friday.

But the Kentucky Republican refused to change course on the trial as the impasse dragged on, saying he would pass a resolution to establish the rules of the trial with only Republican votes and then make a decision on witnesses later.

This week, Pelosi pushed for McConnell to publish the rules of the trial before she would send the articles, arguing she wanted to see the "arena" that the impeachment managers will operate in during the trial.

McConnell rejected her proposal. He's argued that the Senate should agree to a rule to begin the trial and then later decide on witnesses, just as the Senate did during the 1999 impeachment trial of former President Bill Clinton. And he said this week he's got the votes — all Republicans — to go that route.

Democrats argue that McConnell is not following the Clinton precedent, because the Senate witnesses in that trial had already testified before a grand jury, while the witnesses Senate Democrats are seeking — including former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney — refused to testify during the House's impeachment inquiry.

Bolton's statement earlier this week that he would testify in a Senate trial, if subpoenaed, prompted a new push from Democrats to agree to witnesses, but that has not moved McConnell or the Senate GOP conference. In order for witnesses to testify, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer would have to peel off four Republican senators to vote for approving them.

While Pelosi has continued to hold the impeachment articles this week, Democrats in both the House and Senate grew restless over the delay, with numerous Democrats saying publicly that Pelosi should transmit the impeachment articles and allow the trial to begin.

Pelosi dismissed the notion that she faced pressure as a result of any impatience among rank-and-file Democrats, saying the feedback she received was "absolutely total cooperation." Pelosi added that talk about pressure on her over withholding the articles "cracks me up."

This story has been updated with additional developments Friday.

West Lafayette
Clear
52° wxIcon
Hi: 68° Lo: 40°
Feels Like: 52°
Kokomo
Clear
47° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 37°
Feels Like: 44°
Rensselaer
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 63° Lo: 37°
Feels Like: 43°
Fowler
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 38°
Feels Like: 43°
Williamsport
Clear
49° wxIcon
Hi: 66° Lo: 40°
Feels Like: 46°
Crawfordsville
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 67° Lo: 41°
Feels Like: 44°
Frankfort
Clear
47° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 38°
Feels Like: 43°
Delphi
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 38°
Feels Like: 45°
Monticello
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 38°
Feels Like: 45°
Logansport
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 36°
Feels Like: 44°
Spotty Showers Early, followed by Cooler Temps and Breezy NE Winds.
WLFI Radar
WLFI Temps
WLFI Planner

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 108646

Reported Deaths: 3478
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Marion20341757
Lake10013312
Elkhart6198106
St. Joseph586796
Allen5785198
Hamilton4600109
Vanderburgh318126
Hendricks2607120
Monroe224336
Johnson2241122
Tippecanoe211313
Clark205056
Porter197843
Cass19209
Delaware180159
Vigo169621
Madison153075
LaPorte134837
Floyd127961
Howard125163
Kosciusko116717
Bartholomew113257
Warrick104134
Marshall97423
Boone93846
Dubois92118
Hancock89242
Noble86432
Grant85132
Henry73424
Jackson7259
Wayne72214
Morgan68038
Shelby65529
LaGrange62811
Daviess61627
Dearborn61428
Clinton59111
Harrison54824
Putnam5098
Lawrence49928
Montgomery49421
White47114
Knox4659
Decatur44739
Gibson4344
DeKalb42511
Miami4202
Greene40935
Fayette40413
Jasper3732
Scott34410
Steuben3447
Sullivan32612
Jennings30512
Franklin29225
Posey2900
Clay2855
Orange27924
Ripley2768
Carroll26713
Wabash2547
Washington2491
Whitley2456
Wells2422
Starke2387
Jefferson2363
Adams2303
Fulton2292
Tipton21522
Huntington2073
Randolph2047
Perry20014
Spencer1984
Jay1640
Newton16411
Owen1621
Martin1560
Rush1484
Pike1331
Vermillion1210
Fountain1152
Pulaski1121
Blackford1072
Crawford980
Brown933
Parke902
Benton880
Union760
Ohio757
Switzerland660
Warren381
Unassigned0225

COVID-19 Important links and resources

As the spread of COVID-19, or as it's more commonly known as the coronavirus continues, this page will serve as your one-stop for the resources you need to stay informed and to keep you and your family safe. CLICK HERE

Closings related to the prevention of the COVID-19 can be found on our Closings page.

Community Events