The environmental ballot measures that midterm voters backed or rejected

Among the more than 150 statewide measures on ballots in Tuesday's midterm election were several related to ...

Posted: Nov 7, 2018 11:35 PM
Updated: Nov 7, 2018 11:35 PM

Among the more than 150 statewide measures on ballots in Tuesday's midterm election were several related to climate change and the environment.

Voters in 37 states -- many of them in the West -- considered whether they were for or against initiatives related to renewable energy, carbon emissions and offshore drilling.

Ballots

Business and industry sectors

Business, economy and trade

Climate change

Elections and campaigns

Energy and environment

Energy and utilities

Environment and natural resources

Government and public administration

Politics

Referendums

Voters and voting

Air pollution

Electric power industry

Environmentalism

Government bodies and offices

Government departments and authorities

Greenhouse gases

International relations

International relations and national security

Oil and gas industry

Pollution

Renewable energy

State departments and diplomatic services

Utilities industry

Elections (by type)

Electricity production and distribution

Energy and resources

Midterm elections

Here's how some of the most notable environmental- and climate change-related measures went, based on preliminary results.

Renewable energy, carbon content

In Arizona, Proposition 127 would have changed the state Constitution to require nongovernmental providers to generate at least half of their annual electricity sales from certain renewable energy sources by 2030.

The initiative was rejected by 69.77% of voters, according to the secretary of state's website.

In Nevada, State Question No. 3 asked voters whether the state Constitution should be amended to require the Legislature to provide for the establishment of an open, competitive retail electric energy market by 2023. That includes the granting of monopolies and exclusive franchises for the generation of electricity.

Those in support of the question argued that "without an open market, it is difficult for Nevadans to take advantage of new technologies in energy generation," such as renewable resources. Retail electricity markets are determined at the state level. They can be traditionally regulated, in which consumers cannot choose who generates their power and are required to purchase from the utility in that area, or they can be competitive, in which consumers choose between competitive retail suppliers.

The ballot question was rejected by 67.11% of voters, according to the secretary of state's general election results website.

Nevada's State Question No. 6 asked voters whether the state Constitution should be amended to require that all utility service providers that sell electricity generate or acquire incrementally larger percentages of it from renewable resources -- so that, by 2030, at least half of electricity sold by each provider comes from renewable energy resources. That ballot question had 59.26% of voters in favor.

In Washington, Initiative 1631 would have imposed a carbon emission fee on large pollution-emitting companies. The fee would have started with a $15 per metric ton of carbon content in 2020 and increase annually by $2 per metric ton until the state's 2035 greenhouse gas reduction goal -- of reducing emissions to 25% below 1990 levels -- is met and the state's emissions are on a trajectory to likely reach the state's 2050 goal of 50% below 1990 levels.

The initiative was rejected by 56.32% of voters, according to the secretary of state's website.

Also in Washington, Advisory Vote No. 19 posed whether to repeal or maintain Senate Bill 6269, through which -- without a vote of the people -- the Legislature expanded oil spill response resources and "administration taxes to crude oil or petroleum products received by pipeline, costing $13,000,000 over ten years for government spending."

The measure was voted down by 52.8%, according to the secretary of state's website.

Oil and gas, fish habitats

There were some environmental and fracking-related measures on the ballots in Colorado and Alaska.

In Colorado, Proposition 112 would have banned oil and gas companies from drilling wells within 2,500 feet of occupied buildings, water sources and other "vulnerable" areas. It was rejected by 56.77% of voters, according to the secretary of state's website.

In Alaska, Ballot Measure No. 1 would have amended the state's fish habitat permitting law to apply new standards to permitting activities and development projects that have the potential to harm habitats. The measure had 61.6% of voters against, according to the Alaska Division of Elections.

Offshore drilling, new mines

In Florida, Amendment 9 would prohibit offshore drilling for gas and oil in state coastal waters, as well as using e-cigarettes in enclosed indoor workplaces. The amendment was approved by 68.85% of voters, according to the Florida Division of Elections.

In Montana, Initiative No. 186 would have required the Department of Environmental Quality to deny permits for any new hardrock mines in Montana unless the reclamation plan provides clear and convincing evidence that the mine will not require perpetual treatment of water polluted by acid mine drainage or other contaminants. The initiative was rejected by 58% of voters, according to the secretary of state's website.

West Lafayette
Clear
59° wxIcon
Hi: 63° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 59°
Kokomo
Clear
59° wxIcon
Hi: 61° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 59°
Rensselaer
Scattered Clouds
54° wxIcon
Hi: 57° Lo: 50°
Feels Like: 54°
Fowler
Scattered Clouds
54° wxIcon
Hi: 61° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 54°
Williamsport
Broken Clouds
56° wxIcon
Hi: 63° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 56°
Crawfordsville
Overcast
53° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 58°
Feels Like: 53°
Frankfort
Clear
58° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 58°
Delphi
Broken Clouds
54° wxIcon
Hi: 61° Lo: 54°
Feels Like: 54°
Monticello
Broken Clouds
54° wxIcon
Hi: 59° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 54°
Logansport
Scattered Clouds
55° wxIcon
Hi: 60° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 55°
Near Record Heat On The Way
WLFI Radar
WLFI Temps
WLFI Planner

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 150664

Reported Deaths: 4008
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Marion24697784
Lake13220352
St. Joseph8877159
Elkhart8469132
Allen7880222
Hamilton5962113
Vanderburgh559360
Tippecanoe354714
Monroe320738
Hendricks3183130
Johnson2995128
Porter297848
Clark285461
Delaware282074
Vigo252637
Madison229593
Cass222021
LaPorte215557
Warrick188464
Kosciusko176823
Floyd174867
Howard158866
Bartholomew139758
Dubois135125
Marshall132526
Henry122628
Grant120939
Wayne119327
Boone118848
Hancock114145
Noble113533
Jackson108713
Morgan92240
Dearborn91628
Daviess84033
Gibson83411
Clinton81616
Shelby79429
Lawrence78534
LaGrange76715
Harrison74024
Putnam71016
Knox70310
DeKalb69411
Posey6796
Steuben6008
Fayette58517
Miami5845
Montgomery57222
White56815
Jasper5624
Greene51837
Scott50813
Decatur49839
Adams4725
Clay4346
Whitley4316
Sullivan42812
Ripley4228
Wells4155
Starke3937
Wabash3919
Orange38725
Huntington3785
Spencer3706
Franklin36525
Jennings36013
Washington3592
Randolph3398
Fulton3362
Jefferson3305
Pike31913
Carroll31413
Perry29514
Jay2876
Fountain2863
Tipton26823
Parke2203
Newton21811
Vermillion2181
Rush2044
Owen2021
Martin1950
Blackford1923
Crawford1491
Pulaski1471
Brown1303
Ohio1227
Benton1070
Union1040
Switzerland890
Warren751
Unassigned0233

COVID-19 Important links and resources

As the spread of COVID-19, or as it's more commonly known as the coronavirus continues, this page will serve as your one-stop for the resources you need to stay informed and to keep you and your family safe. CLICK HERE

Closings related to the prevention of the COVID-19 can be found on our Closings page.

Community Events