SEVERE WX : Freeze Watch View Alerts

Minorities, LGBT make history in 2018 midterms

Congress will see its first Native American and Muslim women. And Colorado elected the nation's first openly gay governor during the 2018 midterms.

Posted: Nov 7, 2018 8:09 PM
Updated: Nov 7, 2018 8:19 PM

Suburban and college-educated women issued a sharp rebuke to President Donald Trump and his agenda Tuesday night, one that represents a real threat to Republican hopes of holding the White House in 2020.

It was a triumphant night for women across the political spectrum -- the culmination of a wave of anger and women's marches that followed Trump's election in 2016 and the #MeToo movement that inspired so many young women to run for office for the first time.

If the President paid attention to the yawning gender gap in Tuesday's results -- with 59% of women supporting Democrats and 40% backing Republicans -- he showed no sign of self-reflection or contrition during his self-described victory lap at a news conference Wednesday.

In keeping with his pattern of the past three years, Trump once again demonstrated his often rough, condescending handling of women -- in this case, female reporters during his news conference -- which has alienated many female voters.

The looming difficulties that lie ahead for Republicans with minority voters in states like Texas, Arizona and Nevada were laid bare in the exit polls. Nearly three-quarters of Latino women and 92% of African-American women supported Democratic candidates. White women broke evenly, with 49% backing Republicans and 49% supporting Democrats.

Trump attempted to address his party's gulf with women in the final day of the campaign by taking top advisers like Kellyanne Conway, Sarah Sanders, his daughter Ivanka Trump and Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel on the trail with him.

At his final rally Monday night in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, Trump said he had "always thought" that women are smarter than men. "Sorry, men," he added. But his last-minute effort did not appear to have much of an impact.

EMILY's List claimed victory in many of the districts where it had helped women organize and raise money.

"In district after district and led by a huge turnout from women voters, seats have been flipped -- ousting Republicans who have failed their constituents and electing women at a record-setting pace to take their places," said Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY's List. "This wave would have been impossible without a strong and diverse class of US House candidates -- the powerful, pro-choice Democratic women who fought tirelessly to win their elections tonight. We could not be more excited to see them sworn in this January. History has been made and we're never going back."

Beyond the Beltway on Tuesday night, the year of the woman became the night of the woman. Though ballots are still being counted, it is clear there will be record representation of women in the House, with at least 100 women serving next year, breaking the previous record of 85, which was set during the 114th Congress in 2015-16.

There will also be a new bar for diversity, with at least 38 women of color serving simultaneously in the House, breaking the previous record of 34, according to the Rutgers University Center for American Women and Politics.

The first two Native American women elected to the House, Democrats Deb Haaland and Sharice Davids of Kansas, are headed to Washington. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan will be the first two Muslim women in Congress.

On the Republican side, California District 39 candidate Young Kim appeared poised to become the first Korean-American woman elected to the House. In Tennessee, longtime Trump supporter US Rep. Marsha Blackburn defeated former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen to become the first female senator from Tennessee.

Republican Kim Reynolds became the first female elected governor in Iowa, after being appointed to fill the slot. And the Hawkeye State elected two Democrats, Cindy Axne in the 3rd District and Abbie Finkenauer in the 1st District, as its first female members of Congress.

Sixteen women were running for governor in Tuesday's election. Some of those races are still in doubt, but there were some historic firsts. The marquee race in Georgia, where Stacey Abrams is running to become the first African-American female governor in America, could be headed to a runoff.

South Dakota Republican US Rep. Kristi Noem became that state's first female governor. In Kansas, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Laura Kelly pulled off a surprise win as Republican Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who was best known for his harsh immigration rhetoric, went down in defeat.

Overall, there will be at least nine female governors, which ties the current record for the most serving simultaneously.

The race to replace retiring Republican Sen. Jeff Flake in Arizona is still too close to call, but either Republican Rep. Martha McSally or Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema will become the state's first female senator after their bruising race in that rapidly diversifying state.

In Nevada, Democratic US Rep. Jacky Rosen vanquished Republican Sen. Dean Heller in a pickup for her party, and when all the votes are counted Nevada's could become the first female-majority Statehouse.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi hailed the record numbers of women joining her in Washington on Wednesday, but she said the Democratic agenda would not change much -- because she would be steering them toward the entire range of issues, from the economy and financial institutions to national security.

"We view every issue as a women's issue," the California Democrat said. "We believe the national security of our county is a women's issue. The economic security of our country ... issues related to energy and the rest. They're women's issues."

Lafayette
Partly Cloudy
48° wxIcon
Hi: 66° Lo: 36°
Feels Like: 45°
Kokomo
Partly Cloudy
45° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 34°
Feels Like: 42°
Rensselaer
Clear
41° wxIcon
Hi: 59° Lo: 32°
Feels Like: 41°
Lafayette
Partly Cloudy
48° wxIcon
Hi: 63° Lo: 36°
Feels Like: 45°
Danville
Clear
44° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 37°
Feels Like: 41°
Frankfort
Clear
43° wxIcon
Hi: 67° Lo: 35°
Feels Like: 38°
Frankfort
Partly Cloudy
43° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 32°
Feels Like: 38°
Monticello
Partly Cloudy
45° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 34°
Feels Like: 41°
Monticello
Partly Cloudy
42° wxIcon
Hi: 63° Lo: 35°
Feels Like: 39°
Logansport
Mostly Cloudy
45° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 45°
Some More Frost & Light Freezing Ahead......
WLFI Radar
WLFI Temps
WLFI Planner

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 707111

Reported Deaths: 13216
CountyCasesDeaths
Marion963501718
Lake51613944
Allen39106671
Hamilton34449405
St. Joseph33979539
Elkhart27255432
Vanderburgh22060394
Tippecanoe21765212
Porter17945298
Johnson17507374
Hendricks16786310
Clark12681190
Madison12338337
Vigo12204244
Monroe11443166
LaPorte11118204
Delaware10341184
Howard9652211
Kosciusko9114114
Hancock7964139
Bartholomew7880155
Warrick7681155
Floyd7555176
Wayne6895198
Grant6837171
Boone6541100
Morgan6390138
Dubois6079117
Marshall5779108
Dearborn569876
Cass5683102
Henry5572100
Noble540683
Jackson493069
Shelby478495
Lawrence4338118
Gibson427989
Harrison427670
Clinton418653
Montgomery417786
DeKalb409184
Huntington378680
Whitley377939
Miami372465
Knox365989
Steuben364457
Putnam352560
Jasper350146
Wabash347678
Adams337952
Ripley334568
Jefferson312980
White308154
Daviess289299
Wells286281
Decatur278792
Fayette277162
Greene270685
Posey268533
Scott261053
Clay253244
LaGrange252470
Randolph235280
Washington230731
Spencer227631
Jennings224747
Fountain208445
Sullivan207742
Starke203952
Owen192156
Fulton191439
Jay186029
Carroll185720
Perry180236
Orange177253
Rush170724
Vermillion166043
Franklin165635
Tipton160943
Parke144616
Blackford133831
Pike130234
Pulaski113645
Newton103534
Brown100040
Crawford97614
Benton96713
Martin82615
Warren79615
Switzerland7698
Union69910
Ohio55711
Unassigned0408

COVID-19 Important links and resources

As the spread of COVID-19, or as it's more commonly known as the coronavirus continues, this page will serve as your one-stop for the resources you need to stay informed and to keep you and your family safe. CLICK HERE

Closings related to the prevention of the COVID-19 can be found on our Closings page.

Community Events