SEVERE WX : Flood Warning View Alerts

Victor Blackwell rips Trump's tweet on racism

After President Donald Trump condemned "all types of racism" on the one-year anniversary of violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, CNN's Victor Blackwell highlighted the President's history of divisive rhetoric.

Posted: Aug 13, 2018 3:41 AM
Updated: Aug 13, 2018 3:50 AM

A small group of white nationalists has arrived in Lafayette Square park across the street from the White House, where they're holding a rally on the anniversary of clashes in Charlottesville that left one person dead and elevated racial tension in America.

But the group was vastly outnumbered by throngs of counterprotesters who had been gathering in the nation's capital throughout the day.

Organizer Jason Kessler said in his event permit application that between 100 and 400 people were expected to attend the "Unite the Right 2" gathering, which was billed as a "white civil rights rally."

Kessler also organized last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville to oppose the renaming of two parks honoring Confederate generals, an event that drew white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the Ku Klux Klan.

On Sunday he arrived with a small group of white nationalists at Washington's Foggy Bottom subway station about 3 p.m. -- some two hours earlier than anticipated.

Shouts of "Go home!" and "You're not welcome here!" greeted Kessler and his band of supporters as they left the metro station.

Police officers escorted the group as they began making their way east towards Lafayette Square Park, where a crowd of counterprotesters chanted, "Nazis go home!" and "Shame! Shame! Shame!"

The anti-racist protesters had been gathering as part of a series of counterprotests planned in Washington, led by members of 40 anti-racism groups. The Shut it Down D.C. Coalition, for example, scheduled its own rally beginning at noon to counter "Unite the Right 2."

Large crowds of counterprotesters gathered in the early afternoon in DC's Freedom Plaza, where they held a "United Against Hate" demonstration featuring a series of guest speakers.

"Our message is to let everyone know we support each other," said Maurice Cook, a co-organizer for the March for Racial Justice, which organized the counterprotest. Attendees, he said, may express themselves in "whichever way you feel comfortable in expressing your civil liberties."

Kaitlin Moore, 28, of Frederick, Maryland, told CNN she was participating in counterprotests in Lafayette Park to "show this is not okay."

She said she felt it was important to show up after she saw what happened in Charlottesville last year.

"This is not normal," Moore said. "We won't tolerate bigotry and hate in the United States."

In the past, similar far-right demonstrations have been dwarfed by counterprotests.

For example, at a a separate Ku Klux Klan gathering in Charlottesville in July 2017, where Klansmen were outnumbered 20 to 1, according to Charlottesville officials.

Sunday's demonstrations and the opposing rallies are taking place in an atmosphere of heightened racial tension.

In recent months, anxiety over racial bias and racism has been exemplified in instances in which police were called on people of color for innocuous acts like napping in a dormitory common room, having a barbecue and going to the pool.

This week, NFL players in the first preseason games resumed their protests over police brutality against blacks by raising their fists, kneeling or sitting out during the National Anthem.

The demonstrations also come at a time when the wounds from last year's clash in Charlottesville remain raw, particularly in regards to the death of counterprotester Heather Heyer, who was killed when a suspected neo-Nazi sympathizer drove a car into a crowd.

Counterprotesters host a number of opposing rallies

Large crowds of counterprotesters gathered in the early afternoon in DC's Freedom Plaza, where they held a "United Against Hate" demonstration featuring a series of guest speakers.

"Our message is to let everyone know we support each other," said Maurice Cook, a co-organizer for the March for Racial Justice, which organized the counterprotest. Attendees, he said, may express themselves in "whichever way you feel comfortable in expressing your civil liberties."

Kaitlin Moore, 28, of Frederick, Maryland, told CNN she was participating in counterprotests in Lafayette Park to "show this is not okay."

She said she felt it was important to show up after she saw what happened in Charlottesville last year.

"This is not normal," Moore said. "We won't tolerate bigotry and hate in the United States."

In the past, similar far-right demonstrations have been dwarfed by counterprotests.

For example, at a a separate Ku Klux Klan gathering in Charlottesville in July 2017, where Klansmen were outnumbered 20 to 1, according to Charlottesville officials.

Trump condemns 'all types of racism'

President Trump -- who has drawn accusations of furthering the racial divide in America -- condemned last year's events in Charlottesville in a tweet Saturday morning, saying they "resulted in senseless death and division."

"We must come together as a nation," he wrote. "I condemn all types of racism and acts of violence. Peace to ALL Americans!"

It was a departure from his comments a year ago in which he said "very fine people" were among the white supremacists in Charlottesville, prompting a political firestorm that lasted for days and culminated in an infamous press conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York.

Heyer's mother: 'We have got to fix this'

On Sunday morning, as Washington prepared for potential crowds of white nationalists, a crowd made up of leftist and anti-racist demonstrators gathered in Charlottesville and made their way to the site of Heyer's death, where some had paid their respects and used chalk to scrawl messages of remembrance in the street and on the walls of nearby buildings.

There they sang spirituals and held a moment of silence. But like protesters on the campus of the University of Virginia Saturday night, many expressed antagonism towards police, some of whom were dressed in riot gear and who had a large presence throughout the city to prevent any outbreak of violence.

"There's a profound difference in this year and last year and that is the heavy police presence," said Lisa Woolfork, an associate professor of English at the University of Virginia and a local organizer with Black Lives Matter.

Some people might be comforted by the police, Woolfork continued. "But for folks like me, black and brown folks, folks in Black Lives Matter, we don't equate a heavy police presence with safety, so we see this as a perceived risk and increasing the possible harm that might occur to us."

Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, visited the site where her daughter was killed, surrounded by supporters and journalists. She turned to the crowd, and over the hum of a helicopter circling overhead, spoke out against the racial tension she sees in America.

"We have a huge racial problem in our city and our country," Bro said. "We have got to fix this, or we'll be right back here in no time."

"The world went crazy when Heather lost her life, and that's not fair, because so many mothers lose their children every day, and we have to fix that. I don't want other mothers to be in my spot," she said, her voice breaking with emotion. "I don't want other mothers to go through this."

Kessler had sought a permit from the city of Charlottesville to hold an event commemorating the "Unite the Right" rally this weekend, but withdrew his request in a federal court hearing late last month, according to city officials.

The hearing was part of his lawsuit against Charlottesville after it denied his permit application on the grounds it would "present a danger to public safety."

Lafayette
Clear
56° wxIcon
Hi: 60° Lo: 35°
Feels Like: 56°
Kokomo
Clear
50° wxIcon
Hi: 56° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 50°
Rensselaer
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 58° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 48°
Lafayette
Clear
56° wxIcon
Hi: 58° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 56°
Danville
Clear
49° wxIcon
Hi: 59° Lo: 34°
Feels Like: 47°
Frankfort
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 58° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 44°
Frankfort
Clear
46° wxIcon
Hi: 57° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 44°
Monticello
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 59° Lo: 34°
Feels Like: 45°
Monticello
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 60° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 45°
Logansport
Clear
45° wxIcon
Hi: 58° Lo: 33°
Feels Like: 40°
Warmer, wetter, stormy pattern ahead.
WLFI Radar
WLFI Temps
WLFI Planner

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 662750

Reported Deaths: 12623
CountyCasesDeaths
Marion907691647
Lake48461880
Allen35897638
Hamilton32121398
St. Joseph30032513
Elkhart25403417
Vanderburgh21261379
Tippecanoe20050203
Johnson16362360
Porter15987270
Hendricks15835300
Clark11976181
Madison11756319
Vigo11625230
Monroe10343163
Delaware9842179
LaPorte9778197
Howard9059198
Kosciusko8567111
Bartholomew7464147
Warrick7422151
Hancock7409132
Floyd7217170
Wayne6640192
Grant6432157
Boone610088
Morgan6096125
Dubois5916111
Dearborn548368
Cass545099
Marshall5427104
Henry542593
Noble509778
Jackson465067
Shelby460790
Lawrence4186113
Gibson401381
Harrison400464
Clinton396153
Montgomery387283
DeKalb385878
Miami357563
Knox357485
Whitley349537
Huntington345777
Steuben338855
Wabash331876
Putnam330559
Ripley327162
Adams323549
Jasper316643
White297352
Jefferson295074
Daviess285496
Fayette271956
Decatur270988
Greene261580
Posey261231
Wells258375
Scott250850
Clay241644
LaGrange240970
Randolph225476
Spencer218030
Jennings215344
Washington211627
Sullivan203339
Fountain201642
Starke188251
Owen182353
Fulton179037
Jay177928
Carroll176518
Perry173235
Orange171250
Rush165122
Vermillion160842
Franklin159435
Tipton146741
Parke139316
Pike127832
Blackford120627
Pulaski106644
Newton96532
Brown95139
Benton92213
Crawford90713
Martin80114
Warren75814
Switzerland7548
Union67210
Ohio53711
Unassigned0431

COVID-19 Important links and resources

As the spread of COVID-19, or as it's more commonly known as the coronavirus continues, this page will serve as your one-stop for the resources you need to stay informed and to keep you and your family safe. CLICK HERE

Closings related to the prevention of the COVID-19 can be found on our Closings page.

Community Events