Congress unveils $1.3 trillion spending package, includes background check bill

Congress unveiled a massive bipartisan $1.3...

Posted: Mar 22, 2018 12:01 PM
Updated: Mar 22, 2018 12:01 PM

Congress unveiled a massive bipartisan $1.3 trillion spending package Wednesday evening that will keep the government funded until the end of September, and the White House and GOP leaders say the plan has President Donald Trump's support.

RELATED: Read the 2,232-page omnibus spending bill

But questions remain whether the proposal can pass Congress without shutting down the government.

Lawmakers have agreed on funding levels for every corner of the government with $700 billion budgeted for defense and $591 billion slated for non-defense spending, but the legislation also is expected to include policy riders like a bill that incentivizes state and federal authorities to report more data to the country's gun background check system -- commonly known around Capitol Hill as "Fix NICS."

In the moments after the bill's release, both sides found parts of the plan worth celebrating. Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, the second ranking Republican in the chamber and a primary advocate for Fix NICS, praised its inclusion.

"The calls from the American people to address gun violence in our schools and communities have been deafening, and I'm grateful we'll soon get that chance," the Texas Republican said. "Fixing the background check system will help save lives and reduce the likelihood of what occurred in Parkland and Sutherland Springs from happening again."

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said members of his party could "feel very good" about the proposal.

"Every bill takes compromise, and there was plenty here, but at the end of the day we Democrats feel very good because so many of our priorities for the middle class were included," the New York Democrat said in a statement. "From opioid funding to rural broadband, and from student loans to child care, this bill puts workers and families first."

The rush now is to move the legislation as quickly as possible. Lawmakers have until Friday at midnight to pass the bill before the government runs out of money. The House is expected to vote on the plan later this week -- likely Thursday, according to House Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry -- but the main obstacle will be whether the Senate can move quickly enough to avert a shutdown given its rules. If one lawmaker objects, it could force Senate leaders to run out the clock and even face a temporary shutdown into the weekend.

White House gets on board after 'roller coaster'

On Wednesday afternoon, House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke with Trump about the plan, leading White House press secretary Sarah Sanders to release a statement backing the plan.

"The President and the leaders discussed their support for the bill, which includes more funds to rebuild the military, such as the largest pay raise for our troops in a decade, more than 100 miles of new construction for the border wall and other key domestic priorities, like combatting the opioid crisis and rebuilding our nation's infrastructure," Sanders said.

Ryan's spokesman Doug Andres also released a statement following the meeting: "The speaker met with the President this afternoon to discuss the emerging funding bill. They had a good conversation about the wins delivered for the President, and he is supportive of the bill."

The White House meeting came after Trump had concerns over what was not in the bill, but "everyone walked away supportive," a source familiar with the matter said. The source said the President got spun up after speaking to others about what was and wasn't in the bill, saying "there was some 11th hour mischief going on in terms of what people were telling him."

The source said that put everyone into a scramble, including Ryan, who rushed over to the White House to allay the concerns. The source says, "it was a roller coaster for a little bit," saying Trump wasn't happy about border wall funding, some infrastructure projects and lack of beds at the border that the Department of Homeland Security had asked for. But McConnell and Ryan were able to walk him through everything and calm Trump down and everyone walked away supportive, the source said.

Tight timing for votes

A Senate GOP aide says if the House passes the bill Thursday, the Senate could take it up later that day. But passage probably wouldn't take place until at least Friday. The aide didn't know of any senators wanting to put up procedural hurdles that could slow walk the bill past the Friday funding deadline.

House Republicans leaders are discussing the possibility of waiving the so-called "three-day rule" and holding a vote on the package as soon as Thursday, though nothing has been decided yet.

Sen. Rand Paul, a Republican from Kentucky who forced a brief shutdown in February because of his opposition to a spending bill, said he has not made a decision about whether he would hold up this proposal.

"I haven't made a decision yet about whether or not I'll consent to time agreements, " he told reporters Tuesday.

He wrote a sarcastic tweet related to the bill Thursday.

"It's a good thing we have Republican control of Congress or the Democrats might bust the budget caps, fund planned parenthood and Obamacare, and sneak gun control without due process into an Omni...wait, what?" Paul tweeted.

What is and isn't in the bill?

The spending bill includes additional money that could be used to fund a controversial New York and New Jersey infrastructure project. The project known as Gateway was a top aim for Schumer, but had faced obstacles after President Donald Trump said he was opposed to it.

The bill includes a fix to the GOP's tax bill that had incentivized grain farmers to sell their product to co-ops at a disadvantage to other private buyers. In exchange, Democrats will get a boost in the affordable housing tax credit.

The legislation also includes additional money to fight the opioid epidemic across the country as well as more money for veteran's hospitals, Child Care Development Block Grants and infrastructure funding.

But the bill doesn't deliver everything.

Lawmakers worked for months to find consensus on immigration particularly the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. But, despite some negotiations with the White House at the last minute, there was no deal. The White House offered to continue the program for two and a half years in exchange for $25 billion in border security, but Democrats argued they wanted a more prominent solution. Democrats offered the White House $25 billion in border security in exchange for a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million DACA eligible individuals. The White House passed. In the end, all that is slated to be included is $1.6 billion in border security, which includes millions for 33 miles of new border fencing that was already authorized through the 2006 Secure Fence Act.

Also left out of the bill is a health care market stabilization bill authored by GOP Sens. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Susan Collins of Maine, which aimed to lower premiums. Democrats wouldn't agree to abortion-restriction language in the proposal and some conservatives in Congress had expressed concerns about anything that bolstered Obamacare, a law they'd tried to repeal.

This story has been updated to include additional developments.

West Lafayette
Clear
53° wxIcon
Hi: 70° Lo: 51°
Feels Like: 53°
Kokomo
Clear
56° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 53°
Feels Like: 56°
Rensselaer
Clear
54° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 50°
Feels Like: 54°
Fowler
Clear
53° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 49°
Feels Like: 53°
Williamsport
Clear
59° wxIcon
Hi: 70° Lo: 50°
Feels Like: 59°
Crawfordsville
Partly Cloudy
52° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 52°
Frankfort
Partly Cloudy
52° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 51°
Feels Like: 52°
Delphi
Clear
55° wxIcon
Hi: 71° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 55°
Monticello
Clear
55° wxIcon
Hi: 72° Lo: 53°
Feels Like: 55°
Logansport
Clear
54° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 54°
Warming up with plenty of sunshine!
WLFI Temps
WLFI Planner

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 947918

Reported Deaths: 15377
CountyCasesDeaths
Marion1291181990
Lake635721103
Allen53899761
Hamilton44082449
St. Joseph42122590
Elkhart33803491
Vanderburgh30574449
Tippecanoe26915251
Johnson23727418
Hendricks22410342
Porter21832347
Clark17562231
Madison17492385
Vigo16302285
Monroe14545191
LaPorte14389239
Delaware14183222
Howard13971273
Kosciusko11498135
Hancock10935166
Warrick10737178
Bartholomew10635170
Floyd10514208
Wayne10077226
Grant9213204
Morgan8928160
Boone8463111
Dubois7791123
Dearborn769490
Henry7691133
Noble7466101
Marshall7409128
Cass7219118
Lawrence7026153
Shelby6647111
Jackson661386
Gibson6190107
Harrison609386
Huntington604495
Montgomery5853105
DeKalb581091
Knox5535104
Miami548888
Putnam543268
Clinton537465
Whitley529354
Steuben501768
Wabash488692
Jasper483861
Jefferson474492
Ripley457777
Adams446068
Daviess4231108
Scott409165
Clay394957
White393858
Greene393392
Wells389884
Decatur388797
Fayette378578
Posey362341
Jennings356056
Washington334747
LaGrange325175
Spencer321136
Fountain318455
Randolph317190
Sullivan309449
Owen287064
Starke282864
Fulton280454
Orange277859
Jay257038
Perry254152
Carroll245229
Franklin242838
Rush237030
Vermillion235050
Parke221420
Tipton212055
Pike211740
Blackford170534
Pulaski168551
Crawford147318
Newton145845
Benton143916
Brown135846
Martin130217
Switzerland126910
Warren115616
Union98511
Ohio80511
Unassigned0482

COVID-19 Important links and resources

As the spread of COVID-19, or as it's more commonly known as the coronavirus continues, this page will serve as your one-stop for the resources you need to stay informed and to keep you and your family safe. CLICK HERE

Closings related to the prevention of the COVID-19 can be found on our Closings page.

Community Events