Saying goodbye to local legends in 2017

It's not what you take with you, but rather what you leave behind.It's not what you take with you, but rather what you leave behind. In 2017, we said goodbye to three local legends who all have something in common, they'll forever remain integral parts of sports history in our area.

Posted: Dec. 27, 2017 6:38 PM
Updated: Dec. 28, 2017 10:59 AM

LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) — It's not what you take with you, but rather what you leave behind.

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In 2017, we said goodbye to three local legends who all have something in common, they'll forever remain integral parts of sports history in our area.

We start with Harry Bradway, who is most remembered for bringing the Colt World Series to Lafayette in 1969. He broadcasted at Lafayette Jefferson High School, Purdue and other athletic events for decades until he retired in 1982.

He continued supporting local sports until his final days.

"I think he looked forward to that time of the year and wanted to be involved as much as he could," said Josh Loggins who knew Bradway.

Bradway died in August at age 97.

In December, we said goodbye to Jeff Washburn.

"He was the kind of person everybody loved, he was funny, he was fun to be around, he was a storyteller," said co-worker John Norberg.

Washburn started his career fresh out of high school at the Lafayette Journal & Courier, and that was something he just couldn't give up, even after he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

The local sports-writing legend died at the age of 63, less than 24 hours after covering his last game at Mackey Arena.

People who knew him said they take comfort in knowing he died doing what he loved most.

And last but certainly not least, we remember Joe Tiller.

"He did this to his glasses and kind of looked up there and said 'you know,' he took them off and goes, 'if I have to help you make this decision, one of the two of us is unnecessary and I'm not going anywhere,'" said Brock Spack.

Spack is the head football coach at Illinois State. He played under Tiller and also coached alongside him.

Tiller is the winningest head coach in Purdue football history. He led the Boilermakers to 10 bowl games in 12 years, including the Rose Bowl in 2001.

He was 74 when he died in October.

The local sports world may have lost three influential men this year, but they certainly won't be left in 2017.

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