SPECIAL REPORT: Woman shares brother's story to help people struggling with mental health

February was a month Mallory Molter always looked forward to. Although it's the shortest month of the year, it's going to feel longer to Molter this year.

Posted: Feb. 7, 2018 6:18 PM
Updated: Feb. 9, 2018 12:54 PM

BROOKSTON, Ind. (WLFI) — February was a month Mallory Molter always looked forward to. Although it's the shortest month of the year, it's going to feel longer to Molter this year. 


"Three days and three years apart and his was always before mine, even though he was younger...so not really looking forward to our month," said Molter. 

She and her brother, Austin Wolfe, celebrated their February birthdays together every year. Memories she is thankful to have. 

"Just looking at a picture one day and you're just like oh my gosh he's gone, what do I do, I have a lot of those moments," said Molter. 

In November, Molter sat in her living room hours after her brother went missing, hopeful she might see him again.

Days later, her worst nightmare became a reality when Brookston Police found Wolfe's body.

Looking back, Molter still tries to comprehend what led her brother to take his own life.

"Obviously he must have felt beyond what I ever imagined and I think that is what breaks my heart the most, is that they're so good at hiding how horrible they really do feel and that's so sad," said Molter. 

Deep down, she knows his decision is something she'll probably never understand.

She's not alone.

"In 2018 it's still a stigma, depression, anxiety, bipolar, any mental disease and that is what it is, it's a disease," said Molter. 

A stigma she hopes to phase out.

She said in this nation, mental health is just a problem.

"The treatments I should say are a problem, I mean it is very hard to get anywhere, to get what you need to get other people things they need, it's just a struggle and I've seen it first hand," said Molter. 

It's just not something people feel comfortable talking about, but Molter is going to keep talking about it.

"Even if it just helped one person, you know that family doesn't have to go through what we are, I would be floored," said Molter. 

For this one tragic story and the start of Februaries without her brother, Molter has a lifetime of happy stories. 

"I love hearing people talk about stories about him and I can only imagine some I haven't heard ,but everyone just loved him and like they always said his infectious smile and his laugh and I love that, I love to hear things like that," said Molter. 

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