First responders receive specialized training in powerline safety

Area first responders were trained in power line safety Tuesday. Fire and police departments from Carroll and White County dealt with the dangers of electricity. The specialized training aimed to teach the responders how to avoid injury and death.

Posted: Feb. 6, 2018 11:44 PM

DELPHI, Ind. (WLFI)—Area first responders were trained in power line safety Tuesday. Fire and police departments from Carroll and White County dealt with the dangers of electricity. The specialized training aimed to teach the responders how to avoid injury and death.

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Steve Hancock from Corn Belt Energy spoke to the first responders about safety around electrical components. The training included a life-like set up of electrical lines and how to avoid dangerous currents. Hancock taught techniques for disabling lines.

"Electricity doesn't give you a second chance," said Carroll-White PR Manager Casey Crabb. 

About once a year, Carroll and White County First Responders receive specialized training in how to deal with electricity safety. Carroll County Sheriff Tobe Leazenby said safety is their number one priority. 


"We just approach it in a safe manner as best we can."

In addition, Crabb said he looks at electrical incidents with an attitude that promotes togetherness. 

"So it's important that we are all on the same page on the same team working together, we're hearing the same message so that's why we think it's very important that we come out and we do these trainings."

Especially during certain incidents and emergency situations, Crabb said first responders need to know these skills because they're usually the first on scene.

"Paramedics do arrive at the scene sometimes before the utility does," said Crabb "So we need to make sure that everybody is trained in a safe way to be able to handle those situations should the need arise to work with electricity."

The first responders learned how to tackle everything from downed power lines to home outlet safety.

"Most fatalities not only in the U.S. but the world happen at the lower 120 volts that were all used to around our home it's not necessarily the larger voltages that our lineman work with," said Crabb.


Leazenby said he looks forward to the training each year.

"Because there may be things as it cycles back through that we may forget. And so we may see something at demonstrations like this and go 'oh yeah, I remember that," said Leazenby.

Corn Belt Energy also held presentations with Carroll and Delphi schools Tuesday to educate young students on what to do in an emergency. First responders usually go through this type of training once a year.

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