Tippecanoe Co. Prosecutor discusses opposition to legalizing medical marijuana

The Association of Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys released a letter in opposition Tuesday. It lists reasons for saying no to marijuana.

Posted: Nov. 9, 2017 6:15 PM
Updated: Nov. 9, 2017 7:05 PM

TIPPECANOE CO., Ind. (WLFI) — A Hoosier advocate is voicing his support over the possibility of legalizing medical marijuana. This comes after Indiana prosecutors released a letter opposing the legalization of marijuana of any form, including medicinal.

"I think it should have been legalized a long time ago," David Buck said.
Buck, a cancer patient, said there's a definite benefit to medicinal marijuana.

"It does help to alleviate the pain some and it puts you in a more mellow mood," explained Buck. "It does help."

However, some worry about the impact on society.

"If we just sell it on every street corner in a shop, I don't think that's going to help society as a whole," said Carolyn Farrester.

The Association of Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys released a letter in opposition Tuesday.

It lists reasons for saying no to marijuana.

"We're not talking about the medical products that are out there, licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in prescription form," said Tippecanoe County Prosecutor Pat Harrington. "We're not talking about those. We're talking about the wholesale legalization of smoking marijuana."

Harrington is on a board of 33 Indiana prosecutors who researched the subject. He said according to national health experts, smoking marijuana can lead to opioid abuse.

"At a time our state is being ravaged by heroin addiction," said Harrington. "Is it really a smart time to put out and legalize another controlled substance that affects the brain?"

Medical marijuana advocate David Phipps said studies show the only way to benefit is through use of the whole plant.

"We want medical cannabis for the Hoosier patients that need it, and we want it to be done under a doctor's control," Phipps explained.

Harrington said the medicinal benefits should be crafted into use by the pharmaceutical companies. Just like some of the medications used in hospitals today.

"Everyone knows heroin is illegal, but morphine is not," said Harrington. "Morphine is a drug licensed by the FDA that comes from opiates, heroin."

Harrington emphasized the impact he said marijuana legalization can have on children.

The letter said since Washington and Colorado legalized, regular marijuana use in children has continued to rise.

Harrington emphasized the impact he said marijuana legalization can have on children.

The letter said since Washington and Colorado legalized, regular marijuana use in children has continued to rise.

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